How to Make German Pork Schnitzel

Pan-fried with a simple breading, this German schnitzel recipe takes pork to a whole new level. Pork Schnitzel is a 30-minute dinner recipe that will quickly become a family favorite!

What is schnitzel? Find out with this recipe! Pan-fried with a simple breading, this German-style recipe takes pork to a whole new level. Pork Schnitzel is a 30-minute dinner recipe that will quickly become a family favorite!

For some reason, in my head, making a pork schnitzel recipe sounded difficult. I have no idea where that conviction came from, but sadly it prevented me from making my own schnitzel for many years.  So, don’t be afraid like I was, follow along and learn how to make schnitzel!

A few months ago, I got a wild hair and decided to give it a go. I’ve been making this for dinner at least twice per month ever since! In a house like mine where I’m constantly trying out new recipes, repeating a dinner dish as often as that is really saying something.

Pan-fried with a simple breading, this schnitzel German recipe takes pork to a whole new level. Pork Schnitzel is a 30-minute dinner recipe that will quickly become a family favorite! Add this to your pork schnitzel recipes as a favorite!

Here are the most important lessons I’ve learned regarding the schnitzel-making process:

First, don’t waste your time struggling with plastic wrap. Do as I do and pound out the meat inside of a partially closed (NOT all the way closed, or it will pop!) zipper-close plastic freezer bag. Seriously, it’s like those zip baggies were MADE for this. I use this handy mallet and it’s a great way to relieve some stress. 

Secondly, it is important to let the pork rest in the fridge after you’ve breaded it. The cold air helps dry out the breading to keep it from getting soggy and separating from the meat.

Finally, make sure you take the time to fully preheat your pan. If it isn’t hot enough, the meat will get overcooked and dry before the breading turns golden brown.

Overcooked pork is a legitimate tragedy.

Pan-fried with a simple breading, this German-style recipe takes pork to a whole new level. Pork Schnitzel is a 30-minute dinner recipe that will quickly become a family favorite!

Also, here is my recipe for German Braised Red Cabbage (Rotkohl), which makes an excellent side. 

You can also serve this German fried pork with Homemade Spaetzle (another recipe I make all the time!), Beer-Braised Cabbage with Bacon and Apples, and a cup of warm Bavarian Lentil Soup.

PIN ME FOR LATER!

Add this to your schnitzel recipes! This is one of many great German pork dishes! Pan-fried with a simple breading, this German-style recipe takes pork to a whole new level. Pork Schnitzel is a 30-minute dinner recipe that will quickly become a family favorite!

Here’s the Recipe!

How to Make German Pork Schnitzel

How to Make German Pork Schnitzel

Pan-fried with a simple breading, this German-style recipe takes pork to a whole new level. Pork Schnitzel is a 30-minute dinner recipe that will quickly become a family favorite!

Yield: 4
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 4 thin-cut boneless pork chops
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 3/4 cup seasoned bread crumbs
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
  • 2 tablespoons butter, divided
  • Lemon wedges for serving

Instructions

  1. Working one piece at a time, place a pork chop inside a large zipper-close plastic freezer bag and place on a solid surface. Partially close the bag (but not all the way!), then use a mallet to pound out the meat until it is 1/4" thick.
  2. Place three shallow dishes out on the counter. In the first, place the flour. In the second, beat the egg with a fork then stir in the milk. In the third, the seasoned bread crumbs. Working one pork chop at a time, dredge the meat in the flour, then dunk in the egg mixture, and coat with the bread crumbs. Place the coated pork on a large plate or sheet pan. Once all of the meat is coated, transfer the pork to the fridge to rest for 10 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, pre-heat a large pan over medium-high heat. Once the pan is hot, add a tablespoon of oil and a tablespoon of butter. Once the fat is melted and bubbly, add two pieces of the pork and cook until golden brown, about 2-3 minutes per side. Transfer to a paper-towel lined plate.
  4. Beginning by adding another tablespoon each of butter and oil to the pan, fry the remaining two pieces of pork.
  5. Serve hot, garnished with lemon wedges for squeezing.

Nutrition

Yield:

4

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 598|Total Fat: 34g|Saturated Fat: 12g|Trans Fat: 1g|Unsaturated Fat: 20g|Cholesterol: 166mg|Sodium: 490mg|Carbohydrates: 30g|Fiber: 2g|Sugar: 2g|Protein: 44g|

Nutrition information has been auto-calculated for your convenience.

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Did you make this recipe?

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There are many ways to misspell schnitzel, here are a few: schinzel, shnitzel, snitzel, and schnitzle.

December 9, 2015 | Last Updated on January 14, 2021 by Linda

3 thoughts on “How to Make German Pork Schnitzel”

  1. Hi Joanne,
    The plastic bag prevents the meat from splattering. I prefer to use parchment paper. It allows the meat to spread without resistance or sticking.

    Reply
  2. This is how I make it except I don’t always put it in the fridge to dry. I will from now on.

    But why do you have to use a plastic bag? I just pound the meat with a mallet. I don’t want to get bits of plastic in my food.

    Reply
    • Hi, Joanne! The plastic on the freezer-style zipper close baggies is really sturdy and doesn’t break down at all when you’re pounding out the meat. I always use the bags because I don’t want raw meat juices getting all over my kitchen! I really hate to clean 🙂

      Reply

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