BeefEuropeanGermanMain DishNorth AmericanUnder 30 Minutes

Homemade German Goulash

This Homemade German Goulash recipe is a comforting mix of beef, noodles, onion, celery, tomatoes, olives, cheddar cheese, spices and red wine for a fantastic meal!

This Homemade German Goulash recipe is a comforting mix of beef, noodles, onion, celery, tomatoes, olives, cheddar cheese, spices and red wine for a fantastic meal!

Truth be told, I’m not that sure what “goulash” is. Sometimes I see goulash recipes that look like beef stew. Other times, closer to a pasta. Well, which is it?

I don’t have an answer for you, but I can tell you that this German Goulash recipe is the best there ever was.

No joke, it’s soooo good. It’s the most comforting and delicious food in the whole wide world.

This Homemade German Goulash recipe is a comforting mix of beef, noodles, onion, celery, tomatoes, olives, cheddar cheese, spices and red wine for a fantastic meal!

I made a huge double batch of this not too long ago and took some of it over to a friend’s house. They loved it, including their three year old daughter.

Let me tell you – if a three year old will eat it, you KNOW it has to be good.

It’s also SUPER husband friendly, which is a huge plus. I know you all think that the husband will eat anything and everything I make, which he does, but he definitely lets me know when he loooooves something. 

And in honor of Valentine’s Day (Happy V-day by the way!), I’m sharing this recipe that the husband just loooooves.

This Homemade German Goulash recipe is a comforting mix of beef, noodles, onion, celery, tomatoes, olives, cheddar cheese, spices and red wine for a fantastic meal!

Just heat some oil in a really big frying pan or Dutch oven and dump in the ground beef and raw vegetables. Cook for a few minutes, then add the wine, seasonings, olives, and tomatoes. Let it simmer while you boil some pasta, then toss it all together. Be sure to serve this German pasta up in really big bowl (like these!) because you’re going to want to eat a LOT of it.

I kid you not, it’s uh-may-zing. I can’t even put into words how much I love this.

Just make it, and thank me later.

This Homemade German Goulash recipe is a comforting mix of beef, noodles, onion, celery, tomatoes, olives, cheddar cheese, spices and red wine for a fantastic meal!

Homemade German Goulash Recipe

This homemade German Goulash recipe is a comforting mix of beef, noodles, onion, celery, tomatoes, olives, cheddar cheese, spices and red wine for a fantastic meal!
4.5 from 43 votes
Pin Rate
Course: Main Dish
Cuisine: German
Prep Time: 10 mins
Cook Time: 25 mins
Total Time: 35 mins
Servings: 6
Calories: 390kcal
Author: The Wanderlust Kitchen
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Ingredients

  • 1 tsp. vegetable oil
  • 1 lb. lean ground beef
  • 1 medium yellow onion - diced
  • 3 cloves garlic - minced
  • 2 stalks celery - diced
  • 2 tsp. oregano
  • 1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp. seasoned salt - such as Lawry's
  • 1/4 c. red wine
  • 2 15 oz cans fire-roasted tomatoes
  • 1 2.25 oz can sliced olives
  • 1.5 cups cubed cheddar cheese
  • 1.5 cups uncooked macaroni noodles

Instructions

  • Heat the vegetable oil in a very large skillet or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the ground beef, onion, garlic, and celery and cook until the ground beef is cooked through. Add the red wine and use a wooden spoon to scrape the bottom of the pan to release any stuck on pieces.
  • Season with oregano, black pepper and seasoned salt, then add the two cans of tomatoes and the sliced olives. Turn the heat to low and let simmer for fifteen minutes.
  • Meanwhile, cook the macaroni noodles in a pot of salted boiling water until al dente. Drain well and set aside.
  • Add the cheese to the skillet and let it melt for a few minutes. Add the drained noodles and toss to combine. Let simmer for an additional five minutes, then serve hot.
Nutrition Facts
Homemade German Goulash Recipe
Serving Size
 
1 serving
Amount per Serving
Calories
390
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
21
g
32
%
Saturated Fat
 
10
g
63
%
Trans Fat
 
1
g
Polyunsaturated Fat
 
9
g
Cholesterol
 
100
mg
33
%
Sodium
 
589
mg
26
%
Carbohydrates
 
15
g
5
%
Fiber
 
2
g
8
%
Sugar
 
2
g
2
%
Protein
 
32
g
64
%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
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About the Author

Anetta

Hi, I'm Anetta! Welcome to The Wanderlust Kitchen, where I share recipes and travel stories from all around the world. Here you'll find a world of recipes you can have confidence in. These recipes celebrate authentic food heritage as well as modern techniques and ingredients. I believe that food brings us together as much as it sets us apart. Be brave, try something new!

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Comments:

  1. I’m so excited to try this!! Is the total amount of fire roasted tomatoes needed 15oz or 30oz? Sorry for my confusion!

    1. Pretty much anything red that you have hanging around. Merlot, Cab Sauv, even a Chianti or a Malbec. Anything that’s tasty and isn’t too sweet!

    1. Hi, Emily! I usually use whatever I already have open πŸ˜‰ Try a cabernet sauvignon, shiraz, or merlot πŸ™‚

  2. My dad comes from German descent and he always made this and I still do! I am vegetarian so I alter it by using soy ground beef and I add nutritional yeast for cheesy flavor. We never used celery or olives but not opposed to trying it! My dad used butter and I use margarine in it. There will always be different variations of it I think!

  3. Oh my goodness…. I have never seen a goulash recipe so close to the one that has been passed down in my father’s German family. It’s been a family favorite in for generations now. The only difference I see is that this one has oregano and olives while ours does not. However….they look like great additions, and who knows…maybe the original recipe included them!
    Definitely going to try it. Thank you!

  4. Nice dish – not Gulyasch! This is a Hungarian dish and actually a soup with beef, onions and Paprika. The actual stew is called PΓΆrkΓΆlt. Same weight stewing beef with some fat and connective tissue in the cubes and onions chopped with 2 heaped tablespoons Hungarian Paprika, salt, ground caraway (maybe a good squirt of Ketchup but I deny having suggested that). Slow stew and maybe a bit of liquid if it is too dry to stew. NOTHING ELSE! Served with Nockerln (flour/egg/water little oval dumplings cooked in salt water until they float) and pickles.

  5. I use the same basic recipe but do not use cheese or wine. I do add a couple tablespoons of tomato paste as my family likes it very tomato-ee.

  6. It is an Americanized version of German Goulash… our family called this dish American Chop Suey.. and it is as Chinese as German! πŸ™‚ I grew up in Austria and true goulash is a stew served over bread dumplings or spaetzle… I like Wolfgang Puck’s recipe of Beef Goulash. You can find it on the food network. I blogged it as well. Keep cooking!

  7. This looks like a great pasta gulasch! Like you said, there are tons of different variations of this dish – in the region where I live it’s typically a plain beef stew – just beef with a tomato sauce, perfect paired with spaetzle or potatoes – german comfort food at it’s best πŸ˜‰

    1. Hi, Sabrina! Thanks so much for stopping by πŸ™‚ I love that style of gulasch, too! I just checked out your site and I’m totally blown away – you’ve got a new follower!

  8. You are officially one of my favorite bloggers! A girl with a theme after my own heart:) Liking, following, etc., etc. Love your recipes:)

    1. Hi, Christine! How have I not seen your site before? It’s amazing! Did you just get back from Thailand? That’s where my husband proposed πŸ™‚