No Soak Oven Beans

Experience the magic of No Soak Oven Beans and bid farewell to canned beans! A simple, efficient method ensuring evenly cooked, whole beans – a game changer in bean cooking.

No soak oven beans in a dutch oven.

Dry beans are much cheaper than the canned variety and contain significantly less sodium. I also believe they taste better—creamier with a more pronounced earthy flavor. For years, I adhered to my weekend ritual of soaking black beans overnight in a bowl on Saturdays and cook them in my pressure cooker on Sunday mornings. However, the beans lost much of their beautiful black color overnight, resembling a partially-sucked grape Skittle, which wasn’t appetizing.

While pressure cooking was time-efficient, the beans often burst, and I couldn’t ensure a consistent texture. Finally, I discovered a life-changing method for cooking beans. So, how do you cook No Soak Beans in the oven?

Reasons to Love These No Soak Beans

  • No Soak Oven Beans eliminates the need for overnight soaking, saving precious time in meal preparation.
  • They maintain a better texture, avoiding mushiness.
  • It requires less monitoring compared to stovetop methods.

Recipe Ingredients

  • Dried Beans: Creamy, satisfying texture that serves as the foundation for the dish.
  • Bay Leaf: Subtle, aromatic depth, and adds complexity.
  • Cumin: Warm, earthy undertones that enrich the overall taste.
  • Chili Powder: Mild spice, subtle heat, and adds a layer of flavor.

See the recipe card for full information on ingredients and quantities.

Variations

  • Bean Selection: Cannellini beans are known for their nutty flavor and tender texture. Navy beans and pinto beans are other delightful choices. Pinto Beans offer a creamy texture.
  • Add Broth: Incorporate broth into your recipe to elevate the dish with added depth and richness. You could use vegetable, chicken, or beef broth as a flavorful alternative to water. This not only infuses the beans with more flavor but also can contribute to a more savory, aromatic final dish.
  • Enhance Flavors: Enhance the flavor profile with finely chopped onions. Combine them with bay leaf, cumin, chili powder, minced garlic cloves, and black pepper for a subtle change.
  • Red Pepper Flakes: Adds a different type of heat, similar to chili powder.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar: A splash at the end for a subtle tangy twist, enhancing overall flavors.

How to Make No Soak Oven Beans

Step #1: Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit (163 degrees Celsius).

Step #2: Sort through your beans and remove any debris.

Step #3: Place the sorted dry beans in a 3-quart or larger Dutch oven or oven safe pot with a tight-fitting lid.

Step #4: Add 2 teaspoons of salt. Then, add enough cold water to cover the beans by 1 inch.

Step #5: Put on the lid and bake for one hour and fifteen minutes.

Step #6: Check the beans and stir them. If they are tender, remove them from the oven.

Step #7: If they aren’t done, return them to the oven for 15-minute intervals. If they appear to be drying out, add a cup of hot water.

Expert Tips

  • Water Ratio is Key: Ensure beans are covered by about 1 inch of water to prevent drying out.
  • Avoid Stirring Too Much: Excessive stirring can break the beans. Stir gently if needed.
  • Test for Doneness: Beans should be tender but not mushy. Start checking at 75 minutes.
  • Adjust for Bean Type: Different beans may require slightly different cooking times.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I add meat to the beans while cooking?

Yes, adding meat like ham hocks or bacon can enhance the flavor.

What type of salt is best for seasoning?

Any type, but kosher salt or sea salt is often preferred for its flavor and texture.

Can I use these no-soak oven beans for making other recipes?

Absolutely! These beans are incredibly versatile. Once cooked, they serve as a hearty and flavorful filling for tacos, adding a delicious touch to your favorite Mexican dish like Mexican Bean Soup.

Storage Info

Once cooked, allow your No Soak Oven Beans to cool completely before storing them. You can store them in the refrigerator, in a covered container, for up to 5 days. For longer storage, freeze the beans in airtight containers or freezer bags for up to 6 months. To reheat, thaw frozen beans in the fridge if necessary, then warm them on the stove over medium heat, adding a little water if they seem dry.

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No soak oven beans in a pot.

No Soak Oven Beans Recipe

Experience the magic of No Soak Oven Beans and bid farewell to canned beans! A simple, efficient method ensuring evenly cooked, whole beans – a game changer in bean cooking.
4.5 from 39 votes
Pin Rate
Course: Side Dishes
Cuisine: North American
Diet: Gluten Free, Dairy Free, Vegan, Vegetarian
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 40 minutes
Servings: 12 servings
Calories: 127kcal
Author: Linda
Print Recipe

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Ingredients

  • 1 lb. dried beans - any kind, but not lentils
  • Salt
  • Seasonings - I usually toss in a bay leaf, some cumin, chili powder, minced garlic, and black pepper

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit (163 degrees Celsius).
  • Sort through your beans and remove any debris.
  • Place the sorted dry beans in a 3-quart or larger Dutch oven with a tight-fitting lid.
  • Add 2 teaspoons of salt. Then, add enough water to cover the beans by 1 inch.
  • Put on the lid and bake for one hour and fifteen minutes.
  • Check the beans and stir them. If they are tender, remove them from the oven.
  • If they aren't done, return them to the oven for 15-minute intervals. If they appear to be drying out, add a cup of hot water.

NOTES

Storage Info:
Once cooked, allow your No Soak Oven Beans to cool completely before storing them. You can store them in the refrigerator, in a covered container, for up to 5 days. For longer storage, freeze the beans in airtight containers or freezer bags for up to 6 months. To reheat, thaw frozen beans in the fridge if necessary, then warm them on the stove over medium heat, adding a little water if they seem dry.

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 127kcal | Carbohydrates: 23g | Protein: 9g | Fat: 0.4g | Saturated Fat: 0.1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 0.03g | Sodium: 5mg | Potassium: 514mg | Fiber: 6g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 31mg | Iron: 3mg

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About the Author

Linda

Hi, I'm Linda! Welcome to The Wanderlust Kitchen, where I share recipes and travel adventures from all around the world. Here you'll find a world of recipes you can have confidence in. These recipes celebrate authentic food heritage as well as modern techniques and ingredients. Be adventurous and try a new recipe and travel somewhere you have never been before.  Bon Appétit! Bon Voyage!  

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Comments:

  1. I don’t get it. I put my beans to soak to get rid of some substances that can cause digestion problems. That’s the whole point of soaking. If you won’t snake them, so why not just make in the pressure cooker for about 20 minutes. That’s what mine takes. Just get a big pot and you can cook 1kg of dries beans. Don’t add any salt yet, just the herbs and garlic, freeze this way and when is time to eat, heat some oil, add all your seasonings, more fried garlic… whatever and add the beans and cook until desired temperature. This way the beans will taste fresh every time. Or you can add your seasonings after the whole Bach is cooked and freeze this way too. I mean, if you’re not soaking, why waste time and money with such long cooking method?

  2. Thank you for posting a time-saving version of the oven-cook method. I recall cooking large batches of beans in an extra large roaster pan in the oven when I was a teenager but as an adult I got lazy and replaced them with the canned variety. The problem was, having been spoiled by cooked-from-scratch beans growing up, the flavor of canned beans leaves something to be desired. As a result, my diet came to rely too much on meat as a source of protein because canned beans rarely appealed to my tastes. A few years ago, as an alternative, I began using a pressure cooker. But the appeal of that started to fade quickly, too. The pressure cooker method didn’t allow for large batches that I could then portion and freeze for later use. Recalling how my older sister used to oven-cook large batches of beans after returning from two years of international travel, I decided to search online for a recipe that would approximate what I remember. I first came across an oven method that required an overnight soak AND parboiling on the stovetop, followed by a 75 minute cook in the oven. Growing up, I recalled soaking beans overnight but never boiling them on the stovetop. I knew if I didn’t find an easier way to do it, I would just keep buying overpriced canned beans. Long story short, thank you for confirming what I recall from 35 years ago — that the stovetop step is not necessary. Your recipe confirms what I recall: Cooking beans can be quick and easy!

  3. My garbonzo beans tasted much better than the canned stuff. Getting ready to cook some black beans now.