AppetizersBeans & LegumesGreekMezesSide DishesUnder 30 MinutesVeganVegetarian

Greek Fava

Traditional Greek Fava is one of the best things I tasted in Greece. This Greek Fava recipe only takes is a handful of ingredients and half an hour. Serve with plenty of bread and fresh veggies!

Traditional Greek Fava is one of the best things I tasted in Greece. All it takes is a handful of ingredients and half an hour. Serve with plenty of bread and red wine!

Alright, I know what you’re thinking. Didn’t I *just* post a fava bean dip recipe? Um, yes. That’s awkward.

But, okay, here’s the thing: Greek Fava (the recipe in *this* post) is different from fava bean dip. In fact, it’s not even made from fava beans. It’s made from yellow split peas!

I truly have no idea why this needs to be so confusing, but if I had to guess I’d say it has something to do with language. I’m notoriously bad with foreign languages, so don’t ask me to explain this one to you.

If you know why Greek fava is not made from fava beans (or why fava beans are named after a yellow split pea dip… kinda a chicken-and-the-egg problem here), leave it in the comments!

Okay, so on to actually talking about the Greek fava recipe.

How to Make Fava

Here is how to make Greek fava. It is so easy and it is dairy free and gluten free!

Assemble the ingredients and chop the red onions and scallions.

Traditional Greek Favas is one of the best things I tasted in Greece. This Greek Fava recipe only takes is a handful of ingredients and half an hour. Serve with plenty of bread and fresh veggies!Place the split peas in a large saucepan with 5 cups of warm water. Set the burner to high heat and allow the mixture to come to a boil. Skim any foam that forms on the surface of the liquid.

Looking for fava bean recipes? This Greek Fava recipe only takes is a handful of ingredients and half an hour. Serve with plenty of bread and fresh veggies!

Next, add the red onion, scallion, and garlic.

This Greek Fava beans recipe only takes is a handful of ingredients and half an hour. Serve with plenty of bread and fresh veggies!
Return the liquid to a boil, then turn the heat down to low and cover the pot. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the peas are very tender, about 15 to 20 minutes. Once the peas are tender, turn off the heat and add the olive oil and salt.

This Fava Greek recipe only takes is a handful of ingredients and half an hour. Serve with plenty of bread and fresh veggies!Use an immersion blender to puree the mixture (or process in batches in a tabletop blender). Taste and add more salt as needed.

This Greek Fava bean recipe only takes is a handful of ingredients and half an hour. Serve with plenty of bread and fresh veggies!

This Greek fava dip will thicken as it cools.  Serve topped with a generous drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkle of paprika.

This Greek Split Fava beans recipe only takes is a handful of ingredients and half an hour. Serve with plenty of bread and fresh veggies!

Provide crusty bread (preferably with homemade honey and herb bread!) and/or sliced vegetables for dipping.

Traditional Greek Fava is one of the best things I tasted in Greece. This Greek Fava recipe only takes is a handful of ingredients and half an hour. Serve with plenty of bread and fresh veggies!

How easy was that?

With so few ingredients, quality makes all the difference.

The island of Santorini is known for growing some of the best yellow split peas. In fact, you might have heard of Santorini fava, which is fava made from the yellow split peas from Santorini island. These peas are known for being extra tasty with a velvety texture and sweeter than others. “Santorini Fava”, is a “Protected Designation of Origin” (PDO) product that comes from the plant “Lathyrus Clymenum L.” which has been grown exclusively in Santorini for more than 3,500 years.

So, it is your choice.  You can use any yellow split peas for this recipe, or you can splurge and get Santorini Fava Beans (PDO) from Greece and make Authentic Santorini Fava.  If you are going to get the Greek Fava Beans, then you will want to order 2 bags to have enough for this recipe.

Traditional Greek Fava is one of the best things I tasted in Greece. This Greek Fava recipe only takes is a handful of ingredients and half an hour. Serve with plenty of bread and fresh veggies!

I had this for the first time when I was visiting Athens; I saw it on a menu, and when I ordered it the restaurant’s proprietor told me how unusual it was for a tourist to order fava. Not sure if that is actually true, or if he was just talking nonsense, but either way this definitely needs to be something that everyone eats on a regular basis! It is a great Mediterranean Diet recipe.

I like to make this as an appetizer, or part of a larger spread of Greek recipes. Set out a few dishes, open some wine, and have a little party!

Don’t forget to check our all-time reader’s favorite: greek tzatziki sauce.

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Here’s the Recipe!

Greek Fava Recipe

Traditional Greek Fava is one of the best things I tasted in Greece. This Greek Fava recipe only takes is a handful of ingredients and half an hour. Serve with plenty of bread and fresh veggies!
4.5 from 115 votes
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Course: Appetizers
Cuisine: Greek
Prep Time: 10 mins
Cook Time: 20 mins
Total Time: 30 mins
Servings: 6 servings
Calories: 343kcal
Author: The Wanderlust Kitchen
Print Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 cups ~500g dry yellow split peas, rinsed
  • 3/4 cup roughly chopped red onion
  • 3 scallions - chopped
  • 4-6 cloves garlic - peeled and chopped
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil - plus more for serving
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • Paprika for garnish - optional

Instructions

  • Place the split peas in a large saucepan with 5 cups of warm water. Set the burner to high heat and allow the mixture to come to a boil. Skim any foam that forms on the surface of the liquid, then add the red onion, scallion, and garlic. Return the liquid to a boil, then turn the heat down to low and cover the pot. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the peas are very tender, about 15 to 20 minutes.
  • Once the peas are tender, turn off the heat and add the olive oil and salt. Use an immersion blender to puree the mixture (or process in batches in a tabletop blender). Taste and add more salt as needed.
  • The fava will thicken as it cools. Serve topped with a generous drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkle of paprika; provide crusty bread and/or sliced vegetables for dipping.

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Nutrition Facts
Greek Fava Recipe
Serving Size
 
1 serving
Amount per Serving
Calories
343
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
13
g
20
%
Saturated Fat
 
2
g
13
%
Polyunsaturated Fat
 
2
g
Monounsaturated Fat
 
9
g
Sodium
 
787
mg
34
%
Potassium
 
698
mg
20
%
Carbohydrates
 
43
g
14
%
Fiber
 
17
g
71
%
Sugar
 
6
g
7
%
Protein
 
17
g
34
%
Vitamin A
 
158
IU
3
%
Vitamin C
 
4
mg
5
%
Calcium
 
49
mg
5
%
Iron
 
3
mg
17
%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
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Traditional Greek Fava is one of the best things I tasted in Greece. All it takes is a handful of ingredients and half an hour. Serve with plenty of bread and red wine!

About the Author

Anetta

Hi, I'm Anetta! Welcome to The Wanderlust Kitchen, where I share recipes and travel stories from all around the world. Here you'll find a world of recipes you can have confidence in. These recipes celebrate authentic food heritage as well as modern techniques and ingredients. I believe that food brings us together as much as it sets us apart. Be brave, try something new!

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Comments:

  1. I’ve been making Greek fava puree on a regular basis for many years and I’m not even Greek. I love yellow split peas. I’ll try your honey and herb bread with it next time.

  2. I have a theory. Fava bean dip (aka Fool) is a major staple of the Egyptian diet. Probably this is a Greek spin-off of that where they just kept the name

  3. You seem to like greek dipping sauces. Have you tried ‘tirokafteri’ – Hot cheese. It is made of blended yoghurt, feta and hot chilli pepper.

  4. both the fava bean and the yellow-split pea belong to the very extensive Fabaceae aka legume family. It’s quite possible that, at some point down the long history of legumes, the ‘b’ in Fabacae turned into a ‘v’ in Greek and the word ‘fava” was attributed to the cooked yellow-split peas (lathyrus ochrus, one of the many lathyrus species) more commonly cultivated in ancient years reaching all the way back to Minoan times. It’s worth mentioning that, in modern-day Crete, not only do they make the delicious fava mash you describe above adding a wedge of lemon on the side, but, during Lent, they also serve the tender peavine shoots flavored with a few drops of strong wine vinegar and olive oil.

    1. Hello! The “b” is pronounced as “v” in greek. So, that’s an explanation.
      Also, real fava beans were rare and very expensive for the poor greek population.
      They used yellow split beans (“lathuri” ) intead.

  5. We in Northeast England also make dish like favs. Its called Pease pudding, made with split peas. Its traditionally served with ham as a sandwich. The Pease pudding is a spread. Yummy

  6. hello from Greece. I wanted to say you the man in the taverna who told you its unusual for a tourist to order fava is right. he didn t joke. also the greeks eat fava most time in lent time. we like it allyear as well as black eyed beans. kalinichta from crete!

  7. Came upon this recipe after my Greek coworker told me about Fava. She says in Greek they call split peas Fava. I asked her what they called Fava Beans then and she said “I don’t know.” I will definitely be making this tonight though, thanks for the recipe!

      1. Lima beans are actually called gigantes (imagine the g’s are y’s) koukia is a dish with lima beans. they are called that because they are bigger than other beans.

      2. Which is Foul for the Egyptians. I mean Egyptian Foul is Koukia (accent on a) for the Greeks.

  8. I just made this and it was insanely simple. Used a food processor to puree it, and dipped some Italian artisan whole wheat bread into it. I had to add lots of salt and more olive oil, though, because it was a bit bland and at first I was disappointed. I did have a bag of carrots out though, and when I dipped a carrot into the Fava dip…EUREKA! I couldn’t stop eating it; the dip complimented the carrot perfectly. I now have a new favorite, high-protein vegetable dip and will be packing this for lunch all week. Thanks!

    1. I like lots of salt and olive oil in mine, too! Glad you were able to adjust to suit to your tastes – this stuff is totally addicting.

    2. another way id to cut an onion in half and use its peels to spoon the (*fava). Traditional Greek way to eat fava.

  9. Neung kuat yai beer (Leo) sai nahm kheng. A large bottle of Leo beer with ice. It’s a Thai thing ice in your beer.

  10. You’re so funny, that is EXACTLY what I was thinking with the fava! I went to our Whole Foods today and they had dried fava beans but not yellow split peas….UGH! I’ll keep looking because I’ll be making both of these recipes they look insane!